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The bee-cab or bee elevator:

The design and its function are described in detail with diagrams and drawings at http://hivecity.wordpress.com/design/phase-2-schematic-design.

Inside the tower is an innovative "bee cab" or bee elevator constructed of cypress and glass, which will actually house the colony and provide it with protection and warmth.

The bee cab typically will be in a raised position to allow visitors to step into the tower, to look up and watch the colony through a glass window. The bees will enter the cab through holes near its top, about 10 feet above the ground in its raised position. The cab can be lowered to the ground to permit the beekeeper to attend to the health and safety of the bees.

Elevator B is a winning design in a student competition organized by the UB School's Ecological Practices Research Group. It involved four teams of young architects.

To read more go to:

http://www.buffalo.edu/news/releases/2012/06/13491.html

- See more at: http://www.buffalo.edu/news/releases/2012/06/13491.html#sthash.6LLVOi1a.dpuf

Image below: Shows the bee-cab or bee elevator during construction. It is constructed of cypress timber (organic base) and glass, which will actually house the bee colony and provide it with protection and warmth.

Some more links: 

Sustainable Architecture:Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Sustainable-Architecture/196071210407125

Animal Architecture:

The Expanded Environment link to website (Architect-Ned Dodington):

http://www.expandedenvironment.org/


Video clip below: Ned Dodington on Animal Architecture. We all live together on our planet as humans, plants, animals, insects and so on. Should we think differently about the animals, insects, plant, trees, etc., around us when we do architectural design, specifically in an urban environment ?

Video clip below: Exciting video clip on Animal Architecture: Short introduction to the website.