CARDBOARD ART - BAS-RELIEF

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Front cover.

 

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THE BATTLE OF BLOODRIVER  

The first shot from the ‘Sanna voorlaaier’ (rifle) broke the silence of the fog creeping slowly up and along the cold river. Was the slow creep of the lazy fog a sign of the events that were to follow? Definitely no! It would be a day of gunpowder, sweat, toil, and utter survival.  

More gunshots followed; there was an indigenous African war cry at a distance. The raw, unfamiliar battle cry struggled to get over the thick fog which covered the river like a white woolly blanket. There was an unexpected adrenaline rush as a wave of half-naked black bodies started moving towards the lager and the river. You could see the white of the Zulu warrior’s eyes as they approached. The feathers on their weapons danced eerily in the early morning breeze. Was this the dance of death?    

The ‘ossewa’ waggons were woven into a large wreath that contained and embraced the faith, belief, and courage of the Afrikaners now aiming with their longshots. Would the Afrikaners survive the onslaught of the Zulu’s? A cloud of gunpowder billowed from the barrels of the rifles as the battle heated up at the break of dawn. The familiar ‘boom’ sound of traditional 1830’s long rifles filled the ears of everyone. Frantically the women and children loaded the guns by ramming gun powder and lead balls into the barrels. “ Quickly load, they are coming!” rang the voices of the Afrikaner men...     

The first light of the sun was shocked and stunned at the battle scene - the sun was surprised by the contrasts of the weapons. The sharp long ‘assegai’ points flashed ghastly as the warriors ran towards the Afrikaner lager. The ‘knobkieries’ swish-swashed through the air as the Zulus gained momentum running toward the tight knit Boer lager. Would the ‘ossewa’ waggons and the rifles of the Boers keep the Zulus at bay? The Afrikaners were outnumbered by far! The covenant they have made with God - would it protect them?    

 

This is how Mr Van Zyl (DVC teacher) would start his story on his ‘IDENTITY’ as a South African. See the section on interesting, and effective techniques to adapt fiction for nonfiction.

DESIGN AND VISUAL COMMUNICATION LESSON (INTEGRATED LEARNING): “MY OWN IDENTITY - RELATED TO MY WORLD ” (JUNIOR DVC STUDENTS - YEAR 9 & 10 - NEW ZEALAND)

Situation:

You are interested in cardboard bas-relief work. You want to express your ‘own identity’ linked to your culture, history, and your family. You intend to create artwork that will tell a story about who you are. Include your future dreams and plans!

Once your artwork is complete type up a short story about who you are, where you are from (your roots), something about your culture, and more. Be creative! There are no restrictions and limitations on your choice of artwork or your story. Remember it has to reflect your identity! 

 

DESIGN BRIEF:

Design a bas-relief cardboard work of art that reflects your identity, your roots, your culture, your dreams and future.Once you have completed your inquiry, research, and artwork, type up the story of who you are.Include a timeline of the events you are describing (dates/years, etc.).

Take photographs of your artwork and use these illustrations to tell your story.

Use any method chosen (digital or paper) to develop your IDENTITY presentation. Include different ‘layers’ like your passions, your concerns, hopes and dreams. See the rest of this lesson which will guide you on how to develop a layered presentation. Important: start asking questions (inquiry). See the section on Inquiry-based learning! Think of yourself as global citizen!

 

SPECIFICATIONS:

  • Size of corrugated cardboard: about 300 x 300 mm 
  • Use a craft knife or Exacto knife. Please be very careful when using it!!
  • Storyboard/poster/display: Take a picture of your completed artwork on 'IDENTITY" and paste it into a Google Slide. Provide a title and type up a short story on your IDENTITY and the work you have created. You may use several slides. Be creative!
  • Timeline: The timeline of the events you are describing is your choice. You could consider an infographic or any other 'timeline' illustration of your choice. Check out canva.com (infographic) online graphic design website!

What is a timeline?

A timeline is a graphical representation of a period of time, on which important events are marked.Use a timeline to illustrate the dates and times of your story (“Identity”).

Artist’s impression of The Battle of Bloodriver. Credit: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Blood_River

CONTENTS 

 

The Battle of Bloodriver. Page 4

THE DVC LESSON: CARDBOARD ART - REFLECTING IDENTITY (OWN, CULTURE OR REGION) Page 8

‘RELIEF’ - CARDBOARD - ARTWORK. 8

DESIGN AND VISUAL COMMUNICATION LESSON (INTEGRATED LEARNING): “MY OWN IDENTITY - RELATED TO MY WORLD ” (Junior DVC Students - Year 9 & 10 - New Zealand) 12

Situation: 12

DESIGN BRIEF: 12

SPECIFICATIONS: 13

What is a timeline?. 13

Ideas from High School Students. 14

KEYWORDS: Globalisation, Citizenship, democracy, sustainability, enterprise. Consider: Participation & taking action. 17

For example: 17

ACCOUNTING AND NUMERACY: 20

Ca$h course for Kiwi kids: A new financial literacy app for schools gets kids earning money and paying taxes – virtually. 22

TAKING RESPONSIBILITY, TAKING ACTION, AND DOING SOMETHING CONSTRUCTIVE: 22

SUGGESTION ON HOW YOU AND YOUR CLASS COULD TAKE ACTION TO ERADICATE POVERTY: 23

ADDITIONAL IDEAS TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE ARE: 24

ALTERNATIVE APPROACHES: Exploring Identity. 27

Inquiry based learning. 30

Some inquiry question student could ask about their ‘IDENTITY’: 31

Students could consider the following methods to present their IDENTITY pesentation (digital or on paper): 32

VIDEO CLIPS: Bas-Relief Artwork - Cardboard. 32

https://youtu.be/XBdSKmognjg. 33

Marking Schedule. 33

Exemplar: "What Mr Van Zyl (DVC teacher) will consider when he tells about his identity as a South African.". 34

Mr Van Zyl’s preparation of his ‘Ossewa’ (waggon) bas-relief for telling his story about his IDENTITY. Below the different stages of the artwork: 36

Student work: 37

Tips on how to write interesting and compelling nonfiction. 38

Mr Van Zyl (DVC Teacher) strategy:  will start his story of his identity with the Battle of Bloodriver (South African History). He will explore creative writing in his introduction - he will endeavour to “hook” the reader in with an innovative introductory story (The Battle of Bloodriver). 38

  1. Tell a memorable story. 38
  2. Bait your audience. 39
  3. Use emotional language. 40
  4. Say it simply. 40
  5. Surprise the reader. 41

Online Timeline Creator. 42

Suggested layout and structure of your presentation. 43

  1. Introduction: 44
  2. A short overview of identity: 44
  3. Artwork - bas-relief cardboard - symbolism: 45
  4. Interesting facts about Mr Van Zyl and his family members: 45

Something that could interest you: 45

Use inquiry techniques and research to create depth to your presentation. 48

  1. Timeline: 49
  2. Global Citizenship, democracy, sustainability, and enterprise. Participating and taking action: 49
  3. Conclusion: 49

Notes to students: 50

How would Mr van Zyl tell his story and share his IDENTITY?. 50

So, what could a Maori student’s IDENTITY look like?. 50

About the Puhoro of Huntly College: 51   

What could a Fijian student’s IDENTITY include?. 52

Be creative and innovative! 54

Notes to teachers: Focus of the unit of work- INTEGRATED LEARNING.. 55

The focus:. 55

What is Interdisciplinary and Cross-curricular learning?. 57

What is integrated learning?. 57

Why an integrated language unit?. 58

How will integrated teaching and learning impact on ‘NESB’ (NON-ENGLISH SPEAKING BACKGROUND) students?. 58

About the teacher. 60

See more at: Page61